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Spontaneity and Bread: A Remote Chapel Talk

By Nick Haugen, VI Form

Spontaneity and Bread: A Remote Chapel Talk

View Nick’s Chapel Talk on YouTube
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Historical Pottery: Cultural Unity Vessels

Featuring Work From: Tate Fredrick, Austin Hunt, Jasmine James, James Kral, Sarah Mattson, and Maisie Pierce

Historical Pottery: Cultural Unity Vessels

Instructor’s Note from Ms. Aggie Belt: Studying pottery from around the world teaches us about cultures far and near. Using the hand-building technique of coiling, students build a 10 inch tall vessel influenced from two specific cultures. From one culture they chose a form to reproduce, and from the other culture they chose a surface design to reproduce. Uniting these two cultures makes a unique vase. The Posters summarize their research and vases that informed their Unity Vase.

Sarah Mattson, III Form:

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La Plage: A French Poem

By Abby Griffin, V Form

La Plage: A French Poem

Instructor Note from Dr. Downing Kress: As a class we read “Le Pont Mirabeau” by Guillaume Apollinaire. In this poem, the poet visits the Mirabeau bridge in Paris and, as he watches the Seine river flow by underneath the bridge, he is reminded of the passage of time and reflects on a love that is no more. I then asked the students to write their own poem about a special place that is significant to them – one that evokes emotion, memory, sensations, etc. Abby decided to write her poem about the beach in the form of a “calligramme,” a form of poetry often used by Apollinaire. The shape/spatial arrangement made by the poem’s text reflects the subject of the poem and plays a role in its meaning. 

Click the above image to view a larger version of Abby’s poem
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Together: A Community Mural

By Members of the Community Art Club: Emma Lu, Cathy Shi, Grace Li, Grace Lee, Ingrid Yeung, Lily Luo, Sua Yoo, Taylor Zhou, Julie He, and Yolanda Fan. 

Together: A Community Mural

Introduction: The community art club is a recently formed club where multiple passionate artists bring together aspects of community and acts of service to our artwork. Our recent project was a community mural where each person drew one part of a larger image, which were later combined to make this piece. The mural is meant to represent that the individual qualities that each person brings to St. Mark’s is what builds the community as a whole. Without one piece of the drawing, it may not even look like three complete lions! Each artist drew their part of the picture with a different style and color scheme, which shows the diversity that each person’s creativity brings to our community.

Getting to Know Atoms: A Chemistry Infographic

By Keyao (Coco) Xia, III Form

Getting to Know Atoms: A Chemistry Infographic

Click the above image to view Coco’s infographic in more detail
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Science Site Analysis: A Mountain School Project

By Kendall Sommers, V Form

Science Site Analysis: A Mountain School Project

Student Note: This fall, I took a semester off from St.Mark’s and attended a semester school in Vershire, Vermont called The Mountain School. It’s a school focused on outdoor education and connection. We had two required courses, English and Environmental Science. After each unit in e-sci, we would have a final reflection where we wrote chapters on all the topics we had covered. The point of this project was to have a book at the end of the course containing all the content we had learned. Included below is my 3rd chapter, my science site. This unit was a little different from the others; we picked a place in the woods on campus and analyzed it over the course of the fall months. The idea of this project was to learn to be independently observant and develop our scientific analytical skills. Also, it connects to the school’s mission statement regarding building a connection to a place. The project below included my description of my site, my map and timeline I created, and my hypothesis regarding the history of the site.

Chapter 3: Science Site Analysis

Directions: To get to my center point you must first sign out on the board with a faculty member (rule number 2!) and then begin walking on the inner loop clockwise. Continue along the loop until you reach Siberia, then take a left onto the trail leading up to pine top. Here, the grass will be a bit taller and you will see a tree on the left of the path with a really long branch that turns up at a right angle. Now, walk uphill on this path until you reach another path going off to the right. Follow this path downhill for about 60 paces until you reach my site’s center point! You will know you have arrived if the trees around you are mainly coppiced white pines and to your right (south west) there is a clearer section of the woods with no canopy, but filled with ferns. The site is on a hill facing the SE, so check your compass. Also, far to the left you will see the canopy begin to change, but most of the area around you should be filled with those big coppiced white pines, white ash trees, and sugar maples. Are you there? Wonderful! There is so much more at my site to discover, let’s dive in!

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