LEO

Math Modeling: Protein Bars Ranking Project

By Helynna Lin and Tommy MacNeil, VI Form

Math Modeling: Protein Bars Ranking Project

Click HERE to read Tommy and Helynna’s math modeling writeup report and analysis of which protein bars are the best. They considered nutrition facts and developed a formula that “scored” each bar on its ability to help someone effectively gain muscle mass.

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Getting LOST in Michael Giacchino’s Soundtrack Compositions

By Riya Shankar, VI Form

Getting LOST in Michael Giacchino’s Soundtrack Compositions

I’ve always loved exploring music. I can sometimes get lost on YouTube listening to classical music and finding those hidden gems that go on my music bucket list. A piece of classical music is something so deeply intricate and complex. Unraveling the melodies and harmonies by listening is sometimes just as exciting as playing the piece itself. The way a composer writes a piece (instrumentation, volume markings, tempo markings) often tells more of a story than the notes. By getting lost in the mind of a composer, you can discover more about the music than you expected.

When Mr. Camp asked me to listen to a few pieces that are on the LOST soundtrack and give my opinion as a “musician,” I was thrilled. While being in the class, this unique opportunity combined my love for music with my work in school. When considering classical music, although some pieces have a general storyline, I have never listened to or played music that is specifically written for a television plot line. Knowing that this music was composed for the show gave me a deeper perspective to try and understand what the music aims to convey. The melodies and instruments that composer Michael Giacchino employed to create the soundtrack are so different than what I am used to but somehow also feel so familiar because of my classical music background. Having taken some music theory, I used my knowledge in that area to give insight into how the mechanics of the composition are used to create a mood. Going further, I used what I’ve learned over my years playing ensemble music to understand how specific instruments were used to make the audience feel certain emotions. Classical music has much depth, and each part of a composition is uniquely important and intentional.  I wrote a small description for each of four pieces from the LOST soundtrack.

“Life and Death” (Season 1) click here to listen: The changing keys in the chord progression throughout the entire beginning stand out. The switch from major to minor (commonly made by changing just one note!) really evokes emotion because the striking change should hit the audience in (more…)

26.2 & My First (and only) Marathon: The Struggle is Real

By Veronica Barila, School Counselor

26.2 & My First (and Only) Marathon: The Struggle is Real

Most people would argue that coming in 31,897th place is nothing to brag about. When you run a race and finish a hard three hours behind the the winner, I can see how some folks would feel disappointed by their performance. However, finishing the Chicago Marathon, my first (and only) marathon, was never about winning, timing, or even competition. Instead, I embarked on a journey to cross the finish line healthy, to feel every step, and to accomplish something that always seemed impossible.

One of my favorite running songs by Ryan Mountbleu, “75 and Sunny”, boasts the lyrics, “You better believe I’m living for the moment, but my moment is the whole damn thing.” This refrain became my motto as I trained, reminding me that this experience wasn’t just about the joy and pride of finishing the race. It was equally about the pain, frustration, and disappointment that comes along the way. Throughout this process, I anticipated and relished the moments of suffering, knowing that those emotions were equally important to the positive ones that balanced everything out. (more…)

Christianity Meets Judaism

By Lora Xie, IV Form

Christianity Meets Judaism

In the form of a book of doodles and quotes, I attempt to vividly illustrate the differences between Christianity and Judaism by juxtaposing their respective interpretation of some of the most important and interesting concepts in these two religions.

Click on the link below to view Lora’s book on Christianity and Judaism:

Christianity Meets Judaism.pdf (more…)

How the Adolescent Brain Works: In Annotated Diagrams

By Hannah Hassara, Katherine Gao, Kennedy Petties, Ryan Yang, Mary Flathers, Nathan Laudani, Cecily Bradley, David Ragone, Caitlin Lochhead, Teresa Meyer, and Steven Sinchi, V Form

How the Adolescent Brain Works: In Annotated Diagrams


Editor’s Note:
In the culminating assignment of the Biology 30 unit on Learning and the Brain, the students created Annotated Diagrams of their brains and how their brains learn new information. An Annotated Diagram is a formal sketchnote that aims to demonstrate understanding of the information by demonstrating how the information was processed. The following question was posed: “How might the fact that you are an adolescent help you craft learning strategies that work for you and are effective?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scroll down for large images of the Annotated Diagrams. (more…)

The Absurdity of Life: Dissonance in Sub specie aeternitatis

By June Hyunjoo Seong, V Form

The Absurdity of Life: Dissonance in Sub specie aeternitatis

One often falls upon the conviction that their present moment is absurd or the composite of the absurdity of moments makes their life absurd. In that this overwhelming conviction has and does consume a great majority of man, the conclusion has been made that life, as in the entirety of earthly existence, might be absurd. When one comes to view this conclusion on a more particulate basis, during which the conviction of the majority is dismantled, one can see the obvious discrepancy between the state that is life and the absurd that is the conviction in contention. (more…)

Assessment Week Upcoming

During the week of December 11, all classes will embark on “Assessment Week.” Each class meets for one tw0-hour block during the week to partake in an activity, assessment, or exam that moves the class forward.

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