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"The Bloody Crown" and "The Bloody Wall": Two Macbeth Posters

By Katie Mao, IV Form

“The Bloody Crown” and “The Bloody Wall”: Two Macbeth Posters

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The Bloody Crown

The first poster with the black background advertises a middle school play. I chose dark colors to emphasize that the play, Macbeth, is a tragedy. Not all middle schoolers know the plot at all, so I used color rather than words to show them what to expect. Middle schoolers might not take the time to read the rating or description of a play, so the bold colors might catch their attention. The colors strike a balance between being spooky and peculiar. 

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The Essence of Luminescence: Light in The Great Gatsby

By Frances Hornbostel, V Form

The Essence of Luminescence: Light in The Great Gatsby

In The Great Gatsby, light is emblematic of the uncanny attraction to Jay Gatsby’s wealth and power, illuminating the warmth and clarity it brings as well as its isolation and superficiality. Light is ever-present throughout the novel, reflecting changes from dark, tempestuous times to brighter, more jubilant ones. These lighting shifts can be controlled by natural forces, immune to man’s intervention, or manipulated through artificial lighting, bought and directed by the buyer. Gatsby’s life, a whirlpool of bright lights ornamenting his extravagant wealth, is overwhelmingly attractive to those around him. He draws them in like moths to a flame as Nick notes early on, witnessing one of Gatsby’s ostentatious parties. Gatsby’s manipulation of light to highlight positive aspects of himself shows his attempts to control how people perceive him, further revealing the powers of isolation and superficiality light can have. Light is particularly revelatory in chapter five, where Gatsby’s manipulation is paramount in fabricating a perfect meeting with Daisy, the woman he has loved for the five years they have been apart. 

After Gatsby invites Daisy over to his house, she excitedly brings him over to the window to show him that “the rain was still falling, but the darkness had parted in the west, and there was a pink and golden billow of foamy clouds above the sea” (Fitzgerald 94). Chapter five is set in isolation, away from mistresses, husbands, and reality, allowing Daisy and Gatsby to exist, for this chapter, at least, in a timeless state of idyllic bliss. However, the storm still raged, Tom was still a man bursting out in bouts of anger while was cheating with Myrtle, and their marriage still constricted Daisy at the ring finger. Daisy refuses to face these realities in chapter five as she lets herself float in the almost tangible softness of the pastel-painted clouds above the horizon, existing precariously between a storm and the raging force of the sea. Yet, rain is still falling around them, illustrating gravity’s heavy push on the dark elements outside of the floating oasis of billowing clouds that Daisy envisions, seemingly untouchable by gravity. The fragility of this state that is too perfect to be true alludes to its disintegration as reality hits after chapter five. 

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Art Informed by Science: The Mediterranean Monk Seal

By Students in Studio I and Advanced Printmaking Students

Art Informed by Science: The Mediterranean Monk Seal

Instructor’s Note from Ms. Barbara Putnam: This is the first time I have done this assignment with the collaborative help of a scientist in the field.  Dr Bundone is affiliated with University Ca’ Foscari of Venice and with Archipelagos, of which he is co founder, to save the critically endangered Monk Seal from extinction; There are thought to be only about 400. Currently, he and his team are working on a project to photo ID all of the remaining seals and catalogue them for protection and legislation.

Interspersed essay by Darius Wagner, III Form

Grace Lee, III Form
Ingrid Kai Yi Yeung, III Form
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The Effect of Visual Support on Learning: A Psychology Case Study

By William Osborne and Julian Yang, VI Form

The Effect of Visual Support on Learning: A Psychology Case Study

Abstract

Memorization plays a major role in education, especially throughout grade school and middle school. Despite this, many teachers support studying for memorization based tests by only repeating the information needed until it is stuck in the student’s brain. This study examines the positive effect visuals have on the brain’s ability to memorize words. Past experiments have found that the inclusion of images with text would increase a person’s ability to memorize and recall information. To test this, participants were given a short period of time to memorize ten words and then recall them. The same process was then repeated, but with a different list which also contained images of the words. The results showed that participants’ ability to memorize was facilitated with the use of images. One possible explanation is that the brain is able to mentally picture the image when remembering the words, giving it a concrete example to pull from instead of only a few letters on a page. 

Keywords:  Memorization, Visual Learning, Information Recall, Learning Strategy

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Colorblindness To Gender Inequality in the SM Community

By Ryley Holmes, V Form, and Hannah Macleod, IV Form

Colorblindness To Gender Inequality in the SM Community

Summary: 
Despite gains made after the passing of Title IX in 1972, gender inequality still exists in school athletic programs. A close look at St. Mark’s athletics program helps suggest the ideas of gender equity in sports. 

Key Points:Due to Title IX, Women are unable to be excluded from participating in sports in educational institutions that are federally funded. However, we are socialized and have conformed to the norms that women do not participate in certain sports at St. Mark’s. Sports donors at St. Mark’s are required to donate to both the boys and girls varsity programs for a specific sport, as opposed to a particular gender in that sport to ensure equitable funding. However, those sports that only have one varsity team receive all of the funds for only one program. Men typically specialize in one sport whereas women tend to be members of multiple sports teams. This specialization is geared towards men, for their future income is reliant on playing a professional sport. This specialization is reinforced throughout all of American society. 
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Humans as One: How The Wayfinders Illustrates Human Integrality

By Kian Sahani, VI Form

Humans as One: How The Wayfinders Illustrates Human Integrality

Language and culture are like animals and plants: the forcefulness of Western culture endangers many of them. In The Wayfinders, Wade Davis explores the concepts of language, culture, race, and the ways they fare in a world primarily dominated by Western ideology. Within his first two lectures, Season of the Brown Hyena and The Wayfinders, Davis argues that although differences between people are fascinating, it is the similarities that are worth celebrating; below the surface, each person is virtually the same.

Season of the Brown Hyena begins with the statement that “on average, every fortnight an Elder dies and carries with him or her into the grave the last syllables of an ancient tongue” (Davis 2009, 3). Davis then continues with the argument that with every language there is an associated culture; therefore, for every language lost, there is a culture lost as well. Each language has the idiosyncrasies that make it unique, allowing a whole new culture to bloom from it. For example, the different ways in which people may describe a color can reflect something about their culture, such as how much of a role color plays into tradition or how specific one must be with different shades. Each ethnic group’s Sprachgefül, as Germans would call it, affect how the group views language. Lera Boroditsky’s TED Talk regarding “How Language Shapes the Way We Think” explains how differences in language are reflected in physical differences in the brain. These differences will affect thoughts, which, in turn, change beliefs and morals, generating a unique culture. Each of the latter is worth celebrating as Davis states, “every culture is by definition a vital branch of our family tree, a repository of knowledge and experience, and, if given the opportunity, a source of inspiration and promise for the future” (Davis 2009, 5). At the same time, every human on this Earth is almost identical to one another, according to biology. 

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