LEO

Environmental Issues of Yttrium

By Amy Wang, VI Form

Environmental Issues of Yttrium

Editors’ Note: To read Advanced Chemistry’s assignment sheet for Smartphone Chemistry and Ethics of Material Usage, click here.

Yttrium is a metal with atomic number 39, located in Group 3, Period 5, Block d. It is classified as both a rare earth element and a transition metal.

Context

As a metal, pure Yttrium exhibits typical metallic properties, but the Y in smartphones is not in its pure form. It’s always contained in compounds.

Usage in a Generic Smartphone

Y is one of the rare earth elements (REE), a class of very special elements that all have unique properties. Y, in particular, is an integral part of a smartphone screen because it can make a compound that emits red luminescence. Since red is one of the three primary colors of light, Yttrium is widely used to make screens colorful. (more…)

Pitch Project TV Show Winner: Noise

By Bailey Horne, Nathan Laudani, and Luca Vicinelli, VI Form

Pitch Project TV Show Winner: Noise

Concept Art by Bailey; click on image for Trailer.

Logline
Police Partners and best friends Walker Gibney and Irvin Demak undertake a horrifying mystery to uncover the disappearance of multiple individuals in a nearby forest.

Elevator Pitch
Walker Gibney, Irvin Demak, and two other police officers get a call and go to investigate a noise complaint in the woods. As they reach the woods, they split up to cover more ground, and the other two officers disappear. When the missing officers don’t turn up, they look further into the matter, and a bigger mystery unfolds. There are supernatural gifts, a fearless leader, and a war that nobody knows about until now. Meanwhile, Walker is facing an internal struggle with his family. The divorce between Walker and his wife has broken many relationships, especially the bond between Walker and his daughter, Sophia. As the mystery unfolds, he must make decisions that will center around the fate of both Fort Collins and Gib’s loved ones. (more…)

Spoke’n Revolutions: Bikes, Water, and Soul 2018

By Truman Chamberlin, V Form

Bikes, Water, and Soul 2018

Click on Image for Video Chronicle of the Event.

As we transition into the cold and gloomy winters of New England, we cannot help but think about the warmth of summer. Naturally, for teenagers, the hallmark of summer is summer vacation. When I go through the “God-I-wish-it-were-summer” time, my mind immediately wanders back to the 750-mile bike trip I went on in July. Eleven riders ranging from ages fourteen to seventeen, three adult leaders, and two support van drivers all took a step away from their mundane lives and embarked on a week-long journey through North Carolina. This unforgettable trip was a transcendent experience in my life.
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Brownies, Icing, M&M’s, and Calculus

By Colin Capenito, Jack Eames, Boyd Hall, Lennon Isaac, and Kerrie Verbeek, VI Form

Brownies, Icing, M&M’s, and Calculus

Step by step, movement by movement, the task became a disaster. The lack of clarity in unison with a rudimentary understanding of an instructional lexicon, allowed only a few to complete the task at hand. It is not often that you are asked to create a dessert while following instructions verbatim, especially in calculus class. In efforts to shine a light on the importance of communication in calculus, Ms.McBride’s Advanced Calculus class was tasked with the job of creating an instruction sheet to make a brownie that was cut in half and covered in icing, then to have a member of the class follow the instructions in the most literal way possible. After almost every group failed, the message became clear: clarity is paramount in calculus. Like making an intricate dessert by hand, effective communication is paramount in the realm of calculus. One must be able to inscribe their thought process on paper as they surmount difficult problems not only to prove the legitimacy of their work but to show their reader a fully translatable math problem. (more…)

The Apple Does Not Fall Far From The Tree: On Cisneros’ “The Family of Little Feet”

By Grace Kingsbury, V Form

The Apple Does Not Fall Far From The Tree: On Cisneros’ “The Family of Little Feet”

Everyone has heard the saying, “the apple does not fall far from the tree,” but is there any truth to it? In “The Family of Little Feet” from The House On Mango Street, Esperanza plays a game of dress-up with her friends, Rachel and Lucy. They are given old high heeled shoes and strut around Mango Street, flaunting their beautiful shoes and long legs. The three girls are catcalled by many older men in the neighborhood, but they enjoy the attention. In the short story “Girl,” the girl is taught of chores that are expected of young women by her mother. Her mother stresses the importance of maintaining a positive reputation and looks down on promiscuity. Due to the differences in their upbringing, Esperanza expresses her sexuality whereas the girl suppresses hers as seen in their prominent accepted hobbies, varying feedback, and female role models. (more…)

A Journey to My Own Version of Christopher Boone’s London

By Angela Li, VI Form

A Journey to My Own Version of Christopher Boone’s London
The ground spun, quite literally, on wheels beneath my feet as I looked into Siobhan’s eyes. In those few hours, this rotating stage made from plywood was not just a platform, it was a house, a classroom, and a train station. And at this moment I was not myself—I was Christopher Boone, a young man who had overcome the confines of his known reality and broadened his horizons by finding his way to London. This was the last scene in the school play, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, the denouement. The plywood creaked slightly under our weight, and the lights dimmed to allow glow-in-the-dark stars to shine and illuminate the final moments of this chapter. As Christopher reflected on his adventures, I saw how I had made my own journey of growth through theater. (more…)

Q: What advice will you give students who are interested in STEM Fellowship?

Grant Gattuso ’19: For students who are interested in the STEM Fellowship, I would suggest brainstorming plausible, practical, experiment-based ideas. Then, find a way to show authentic interest in that topic to ensure that you will stay motivated throughout the entire year.  Strong interest and practicality are the two most important parts of the STEM Fellowship.

 

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