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ASL Sign Language to Popular Songs

By Samantha Sarafin, VI Form

ASL Sign Language to Popular Songs

In the spring term of St. Mark’s Saturdays, I created and taught this course: “In this course you will learn and practice the foundational elements of American Sign Language, from alphabet-based finger-spelling to more specific signs in vocabulary units. You will learn essential questions and phrases to communicate effectively in ASL and engage with various activities to practice ASL with your peers. You will also learn the history and social contexts of American Sign Language to develop an appreciation for the diversity and cultural richness of the deaf community.”

I designed the final project to be a video performance of an ASL song cover. Each student

Please click image for full video!

found resources and learned the signs to perform one whole song in ASL. Students spent time in and out of class working on the project and presented their videos in the final class. The goals of the assignment were to learn ASL vocabulary, understand how to sign songs, understand ASL word order, and practice sign fluency. This video is a compilation of each of the covers created by the students.

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STEM Fellow: Probing the Semantic Representations of Emotional and Social Concepts in Autism

By Lucy Cao, VI Form

 

Probing the Semantic Representations of Emotional and Social Concepts in Autism

Abstract

Please Click The Image To Download/See the  Poster

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a set of neurodevelopmental disorders as shown through difficulties in social interaction and communication as well as repetitive behaviors. Symptoms of ASD manifest at an early age and become most prominent between the ages two to three years old. One major area of defect common among ASD individuals is language and communication, especially the ability to comprehend language and make inferences based on social and emotional context. Recent linguistics studies have shown that there is an association between the ability of individuals with autism to attribute mental states (to themselves and others) and verbal skills. It is found that high-functioning ASD individuals have a less coherent representation of emotional experiences and tend to avoid using emotional terminology. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between social competence and semantic representation of social and emotional concepts. Knowing that lexical co-occurrences are useful measurements of semantic knowledge, participants of this study were asked to rate pairs of verbs in terms of similarity on a scale from 1 to 5, 1 being very similar and 5 being very dissimilar. Data collected from the typically developing (TD) participants indicates that there is a correlation between social competence and accuracy of similarity ratings of verbs containing social and emotional content. The less socially competent, the less accurate the ratings are. Moreover, such a correlation is not present in verbs of no social or emotional content. However, the investigator failed to identify a significant difference in the ASD population’s perception of emotional and social verbs and the control participants’ perception of these verbs due to reasons of methodology.

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The School of Athens’ Tableau Vivant . . . & Memes!

By Keely Dion, Cooper Sarafin, Dylan Sotir, & Charlotte Wood, VI Form and Reevie Fenstermacher, IV Form

The School of Athens’ Tableau Vivant . . . & Memes!

Χαιρετε! Over the course of this school year, we, the Greek II class have put together our Classics Diploma Project, an analysis and celebration of Raphael’s The School of Athens. Our inspiration for this project came from many different places. In class, we’ve read the works of great Greek writers, such as Aristophanes, Plato, and Xenophon, three authors who present different accounts of Socrates’ life. Charlotte Wood, one of the students in the class, had traveled to Rome in the summer of 2015, and while she was there she saw Raphael’s Rooms in The Vatican. She was awestruck by the scale, perfection, and beauty of each work, The School of Athens in particular. She then began studying the work in Art History, and her love for it grew. Once the class started learning about Plato and Aristotle, she shared her enthusiasm for the painting, and the class appreciated the work as much as she did. We then decided to frame the project around Raphael’s awe-inspiring masterpiece.
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20% Time (Genius Hour) With Freshmen: Civic Action

By Ms. Casey Pickett’s III Formers

20% Time (Genius Hour) With Freshmen: Civic Action

Editor’s Note: In Ms. Casey Pickett’s III Form English classes, her students pursue 20% Time (or “Genius Hour”) projects. Below are Ms. Pickett’s instructions, a student’s reflection, and several artifacts from the experience. Please keep scrolling! 

Purpose:

The purpose of the project is to give you time to pursue something that you are passionate about, interested in, or something you’ve always wanted to do. It is a time for you to be creative and to take ownership of your learning AND your education. If it is important to you, it has value.

Essential Questions:

What does it mean to be a citizen (global, local, digital)?

What are civics? Why is it important that we are civically engaged?

How can I be a voice for and/or create social change?

Please click here for the full assignment explanation.

A Reflection by Paige LaMalva

As a student, I feel as though there isn’t enough time after academics and athletics to pursue something a student is interested in. At a school like St. Mark’s, for example, we are in class from 8:30am-3:00 pm and then at sports from 3:30-5:00 pm, which is followed by a short period of time to relax before study hall at 7:30 pm. With the 20% Time project, my fellow classmates and I were permitted to explore a topic of our interest. For me, I chose to research pancreatic cancer. Without the 45-minute block per week working on this, I wouldn’t have learned why pancreatic cancer is called “The Silent Cancer.”  (more…)

“My Brother’s Baseball Mitt”–Script & Video on Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye

By Colin Capenito, IV Form

 

“My Brother’s Baseball Mitt”–Script & Video on Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye

Continued: Click here for full script!

Click here for video of scripted scene.

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Collaborating on the Command Form in French

By Two French II Classes

Collaborating on the Command Form in French

Editor’s Note: French II students did a full class collaboration in which they made a video entitled, “How to survive at St. Mark’s: A guide for new students.” The video was designed to use the command form in French. The collaborative nature of this project meant that every student had a role in editing, filming, adding music, collecting videos, writing and revising the actual script.

Click here or above image for video by Frank Hua, Nate King, Luc Côté, Jovin Ho, William Osborne, Paige LaMalva, Emma Viens, Izzy O’Toole, Jonathan Noel, Daniela Martinez, and Julianna Gong.

Click here above image for video by Ainsley Dubose, Tucker Hartmann, Sam Leslie, Leann Li, Phoebe Macleod, Aidana Maitekova, Dom Mongillo, Edwardo Perez, Noah Robb, Robert Somme’s, Lindsay Strong, Benjamin Teixeira, Madeleine Wass, TianYu Zhao, and Lucy Zheng. (more…)