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The Blueprint Hackathon and Finding Your Scientist Doppelgänger

By Luc Coté, Filip Kierzenka, Connor Browder, V Form and Jason Chen, IV Form

The Blueprint Hackathon and Finding Your Scientist Doppelgänger

On February 17th and 18th, the annual Blueprint Hackathon was held at MIT. You may wonder what exactly a Hackathon is, and we certainly wouldn’t blame you. A Hackathon is essentially a “Hacking” Convention, although “Hacking” is used very liberally to make the name sound cooler than “Computer Science” Convention. On the first day, we had the Learnathon, which is devoted entirely to learning about computer science, specifically about App Development, Web Design, or Basics of Coding. Taking the Web Design course, we learned a lot about a style of programming our JAVA based classes have not exposed us to.

The first day was an appetizer of new knowledge. The second day gave the main course: The Buildathon. This is where we put our knowledge to the test, working as a team to create a final project in 9 hours. Our idea was to build a program that matches a user’s face to a famous scientist doppelgänger. (more…)

Bee Keeping & Legitimately Fun Facts About Bees!

By Reily Scott, III Form

Bee Keeping & Legitimately Fun Facts About Bees!

Ever since kindergarten, I have been beekeeping with my mother, but we aren’t the first in our family. Our beekeeping tradition goes back four generations to my great-grandmother Charlotte Ames, but I am the first male beekeeper in my family. My sister, on the other hand, does not want to involve herself with bugs in any way. She will go days without using her bathroom if there is a ladybug somewhere inside.

 

I  have loved bugs all my life. When I was three or four years old, I would find stinkbugs, because my old house had an abundance of them, and stuff them in my matchbox cars and drive them around town. Though I couldn’t get my hands on bees to put them in cars, I still loved them anyway. (more…)

Self-Paced Learning in Latin III and III Honors

By Jeanna Cook and Dr. Heather Harwood, Classics Faculty

Self- Paced Learning in Latin III and III Honors

The Classics Department is trying something new this year: self-paced learning. We kicked off this departmental goal almost accidentally as we planned for separate courses in separate places this past summer. Dr. Heather Harwood was working on revamping the Latin III Honors course to better support students who continue with the language in Advanced Latin Readings thereafter. Jeanna Cook was looking for a way to restructure the Latin III course to better serve incoming students who place into Latin III. In our first department meeting of the year, we realized that we were attempting to solve different problems, but that we had designed curricula that pulled from the same methodology. Self-paced learning, assisted by the module structure in our LMS, Canvas, offered a common means by which we hoped that we could achieve our individual course goals. (more…)

Quel rôle est-ce que la technologie joue dans la communication en 2017?

By Luc Cote, V Form

 

Quel rôle est-ce que la technologie joue dans la communication en 2017?

La technologie d’une génération définit comment chaque génération communique. Avant 1844 tout le monde communiquait en s’écrivant et en se parlant. En 1844, Samuel Morse a inventé le télégraphe. Pour la première fois, les gens pouvaient communiquer à tout le monde instantanément, le télégraphe a changé la façon dont les gens communiquaient. Tout le monde utilisait la nouvelle technologie de communication, c’était brilliant.

Mais, en 1876 Alexander Graham Belle a inventé le téléphone, et pour la première fois on pouvait écouter et parler en temps réel avec une personne loins de soi. Alors que la technologie facilitait la communication, la communication devenait moins officielle. (more…)

26.2 & My First (and only) Marathon: The Struggle is Real

By Veronica Barila, School Counselor

26.2 & My First (and Only) Marathon: The Struggle is Real

Most people would argue that coming in 31,897th place is nothing to brag about. When you run a race and finish a hard three hours behind the the winner, I can see how some folks would feel disappointed by their performance. However, finishing the Chicago Marathon, my first (and only) marathon, was never about winning, timing, or even competition. Instead, I embarked on a journey to cross the finish line healthy, to feel every step, and to accomplish something that always seemed impossible.

One of my favorite running songs by Ryan Mountbleu, “75 and Sunny”, boasts the lyrics, “You better believe I’m living for the moment, but my moment is the whole damn thing.” This refrain became my motto as I trained, reminding me that this experience wasn’t just about the joy and pride of finishing the race. It was equally about the pain, frustration, and disappointment that comes along the way. Throughout this process, I anticipated and relished the moments of suffering, knowing that those emotions were equally important to the positive ones that balanced everything out. (more…)

How the Adolescent Brain Works: In Annotated Diagrams

By Hannah Hassara, Katherine Gao, Kennedy Petties, Ryan Yang, Mary Flathers, Nathan Laudani, Cecily Bradley, David Ragone, Caitlin Lochhead, Teresa Meyer, and Steven Sinchi, V Form

How the Adolescent Brain Works: In Annotated Diagrams


Editor’s Note:
In the culminating assignment of the Biology 30 unit on Learning and the Brain, the students created Annotated Diagrams of their brains and how their brains learn new information. An Annotated Diagram is a formal sketchnote that aims to demonstrate understanding of the information by demonstrating how the information was processed. The following question was posed: “How might the fact that you are an adolescent help you craft learning strategies that work for you and are effective?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scroll down for large images of the Annotated Diagrams. (more…)