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From The Writers’ Room: Extracurricular, An Original TV Series

By Riya Shankar, Lulu Eastman, Lillian Stout, Cooper Giblin, Tony Banson, Nick Hallal, Sophie Haugen, Sada Nichols-Worley, Ben Hunnewell, and Jimmy Tobin, VI Form

From The Writers’ Room: Extracurricular, An Original TV Series

(Above title sequence scene: music composed and played by Riya Shankar & Sophie Haugen)

Check out Extracurricular’s fan website here: https://extracurricular.squarespace.com

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20% Time Project: Gardening–The Long Process of Planting

By Eve Elkins, III Form

20% Time Project: Gardening–The Long Process of Planting

Editors’ Note: In Ms. Amanda Hultin’s III Form English classes, her students pursue 20% Time (or “Genius Hour”) projects. Some essential elements include taking control of one’s own learning, choosing an individual topic, deciding how to learn and to produce a public product, and reflecting on the process.

Click on image to view Eve’s Padlet.

Reflection on learning:

*What content/information did you learn during this project?

I learned about gardening. I learned that the perfect time to water the plants is in the afternoon. If you water them at night or early morning, they are more likely to grow fungus. I also learned that snap peas, which was the vegetable I was growing, grow best in mid-spring, which was when we started this project. They also have the quickest growing rate which was about two months. That is how I came to choose snap peas. When I contacted the manager of Chestnut Hill Farms, I was able to find out about the evolution about gardening. Now, in current times, gardening has shifted to being grown indoors all year round. Gardening used to be seasonal but now, due to modern technology, there have been trucks and trailers developed to sustain plants even in winter. Lots of people still garden but the way we do it has changed. (more…)

Leadership from All Directions – The Collaborative Effort of Lion Term

By Liz McCulloch, Director of Lion Term and French Faculty

 

Leadership from All Directions – The Collaborative Effort of Lion Term

Editors’ Note: This piece originally appeared in the gcLi’s Leadership blog on 2 April. You can further seek the Gardner Carney Leadership Institute on Facebook by clicking here.

Last Spring, our entire community experienced the first ever St. Mark’s Lion Term, a two-week experiential education program that ends the school year. During Lion Term, each grade has its own unique focus and all 10th grade students work with local organizations to promote community engagement. We adopted a modified version of the African Leadership Academy’s BUILD model, a form of design-thinking adapted for social entrepreneurship. The ideas were iterated and tested first, and students came away with the confidence that working together, they can play a role in their communities.

One of my favorite stories from last year’s Lion Term involves a group of 10th grade students who worked at Daniel’s Table, an organization committed to ending hunger in Framingham, MA and beyond. After volunteering to serve meals and talking to the founders and clients at Daniel’s Table, our group recognized that it would be helpful to list the ingredients in multiple languages for those who do not speak English or who are not familiar with the local produce. The group decided to make laminated cards with ingredients in English, Spanish, and Portuguese on one side and recipe ideas on the back. In working to understand the needs that the organization was meeting, our students were able to offer a solution that helped the organization to improve its service. (more…)

Language Immersion Trips: A Must-Have For A Student’s Bucket List

By Paige LaMalva, IV Form 

 

Language Immersion Trips: A Must-Have For A Student’s Bucket List

I have loved the French language ever since I was in sixth grade. My middle school French teacher, Mrs. Okacha, made French my favorite subject because her class was both engaging and interactive. When I was in eighth grade, I helped lead one of her younger classes because I appreciated and enjoyed French so much.

After arriving at St. Mark’s and hearing about the French language trip offered every other year, I wanted to pursue it. I still loved the language, and I was to speaking a lot more French with my teacher, Ms. McColloch. I kept telling myself, “I can’t wait to be a sophomore and communicate in a real-world scenario.” I was exhilarated to find out that I got a spot on the trip. My French education would be applied in a real-world setting! Reading and speaking French was going to be challenging, but I was ready to take it on. (more…)

The Blueprint Hackathon and Finding Your Scientist Doppelgänger

By Luc Coté, Filip Kierzenka, Connor Browder, V Form and Jason Chen, IV Form

The Blueprint Hackathon and Finding Your Scientist Doppelgänger

On February 17th and 18th, the annual Blueprint Hackathon was held at MIT. You may wonder what exactly a Hackathon is, and we certainly wouldn’t blame you. A Hackathon is essentially a “Hacking” Convention, although “Hacking” is used very liberally to make the name sound cooler than “Computer Science” Convention. On the first day, we had the Learnathon, which is devoted entirely to learning about computer science, specifically about App Development, Web Design, or Basics of Coding. Taking the Web Design course, we learned a lot about a style of programming our JAVA based classes have not exposed us to.

The first day was an appetizer of new knowledge. The second day gave the main course: The Buildathon. This is where we put our knowledge to the test, working as a team to create a final project in 9 hours. Our idea was to build a program that matches a user’s face to a famous scientist doppelgänger. (more…)

Bee Keeping & Legitimately Fun Facts About Bees!

By Reily Scott, III Form

Bee Keeping & Legitimately Fun Facts About Bees!

Ever since kindergarten, I have been beekeeping with my mother, but we aren’t the first in our family. Our beekeeping tradition goes back four generations to my great-grandmother Charlotte Ames, but I am the first male beekeeper in my family. My sister, on the other hand, does not want to involve herself with bugs in any way. She will go days without using her bathroom if there is a ladybug somewhere inside.

 

I  have loved bugs all my life. When I was three or four years old, I would find stinkbugs, because my old house had an abundance of them, and stuff them in my matchbox cars and drive them around town. Though I couldn’t get my hands on bees to put them in cars, I still loved them anyway. (more…)