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Wake Up! Dreamers: A Rebellious Pamphlet

By Gabe Xu, VI Form

Wake Up! Dreamers: A Rebellious Pamphlet

Editor’s Note: In the VI Form elective “Rebels with a Cause,” the students were tasked with creating articles in a “pamphlet” with an intentional tone to instigate with the dedication of a rebel, thus the approach and aim of the text may come across as aggressive due to the parameters of the assignment. 

Click on image above or here to access articles.

Articles:

Undocumented Immigration…is Wrong.

“Life Is Priceless”…is Wrong.

Political Correctness…is Wrong.

Moral Vegetarianism…is Wrong.

Forced Good Deed…is Wrong. (more…)

An Analysis of Alienation: The Natural Estrangement of the Individual

By Cooper Sarafin, VI Form

An Analysis of Alienation: The Natural Estrangement of the Individual

Total Estrangement

Alienation is a natural state of human beings. We are set in an environment that leaves us with a sense of inadequacy and ineptitude and no matter what extent to which we alter our facades and wear a mask of falsity; we will never be able to cross the glass ceiling that is our expectations. From the very moment we are conceived, we are being classified and divided among throngs of opinions, preferences, and expectations. We are expected to live up to this normality of society, the ever prevalent quest to “fit in”. To be amidst the general populace and succeed in a manner relative to the ideas of said society and government that preside over our specific demographic. We are expected to succeed in the realm of capitalism and to move further up this hierarchy and supersede the ranks of the proletariat in turn for the bourgeoisie. We are expected to develop social relationships with everyone we meet and to be liked by them. We are expected to achieve great things and to do what has never been done before. In the aftermath of all this expectation, what is left for us to expect for ourselves other than that which has been told to us? In that we are governed by these (more…)

20% Time (Genius Hour) With Freshmen: Civic Action

By Ms. Casey Pickett’s III Formers

20% Time (Genius Hour) With Freshmen: Civic Action

Editor’s Note: In Ms. Casey Pickett’s III Form English classes, her students pursue 20% Time (or “Genius Hour”) projects. Below are Ms. Pickett’s instructions, a student’s reflection, and several artifacts from the experience. Please keep scrolling! 

Purpose:

The purpose of the project is to give you time to pursue something that you are passionate about, interested in, or something you’ve always wanted to do. It is a time for you to be creative and to take ownership of your learning AND your education. If it is important to you, it has value.

Essential Questions:

What does it mean to be a citizen (global, local, digital)?

What are civics? Why is it important that we are civically engaged?

How can I be a voice for and/or create social change?

Please click here for the full assignment explanation.

A Reflection by Paige LaMalva

As a student, I feel as though there isn’t enough time after academics and athletics to pursue something a student is interested in. At a school like St. Mark’s, for example, we are in class from 8:30am-3:00 pm and then at sports from 3:30-5:00 pm, which is followed by a short period of time to relax before study hall at 7:30 pm. With the 20% Time project, my fellow classmates and I were permitted to explore a topic of our interest. For me, I chose to research pancreatic cancer. Without the 45-minute block per week working on this, I wouldn’t have learned why pancreatic cancer is called “The Silent Cancer.”  (more…)

Ceramics: “Patterns From Nature” Sculpture Garden {Pictures!}

By Ashley Lee, VI Form; Tony Banson and Darren Pike, V Form; Ashley Battiata, Charlotte Galusza, Lillie Harrison, Tucker Hartmann, Sam Leslie, Phoebe Macleod, Noah Robb, Cam Rubin, Bobby Sommers, and Tyler Young, III Form

Ceramics: “Patterns From Nature” Sculpture Garden {Pictures!}

Editor’s Note: The Patterns from Nature project began with exploring Biomimicry and EcoArt.  Students then researched nature on a microscopic scale. This involved studying the most finite details in structures to find intriguing patterns, forms, and textures.  Inspiration could be found in very obscure places: whether a human cell, rock crystal, or a plant stem. Gathering these designs from nature, students then sketched combinations of patterns and forms to arrive at unique clay module sculptures. This year’s Sculpture class decided to display their work outdoors in the Taft Sculpture garden.

(more…)

To the 2017 Graduates of Elite High Schools

By Steven Li, VI Form

To the 2017 Graduates of Elite High Schools

For seniors, graduation is approaching us faster than we think. In addition to celebrating the payoff of our hard work, our departure from elite schools, particularly independent schools, also means we are about to enter the society that it has sheltered us from. This society is not very friendly and accepting. Truth be told, it has never been this divisive since the Vietnam War and never this irrational since the Red Terror. Disagreement escalates into hatred, frenziness replaces reason, and worst of all, we as a society struggle to find a common moral standard.

In such circumstance, people criticize the elites of our society, blasting them for not caring about voices of general public, being selfish in their decisions, and to sum up, causing all the social disorders from their high ground in Capitol Hill, Wall Street, and Silicon Valley. Secretary Clinton calls “Wall Street Elites” a threat to the “Main Street” for ordinary American people. And, President Trump criticizes the rigged political system since the first day of his campaign. These voices have definitely raised society’s hatred toward elites. And the US is definitely not alone in this case. Back in my hometown, Beijing, it’s impossible to get a taxi ride without hearing the driver complaining how his livelihood is ruined by selfish elites. In my second hometown, Hong Kong, tens of thousands of anti-establishment protesters set up camps on the main street of Hong Kong island, right outside my dad’s office building. Because of that, by the way, he was forced to walk 30 minutes everyday to work. Surrounded by nothing but bad news, he was somewhat reassured by losing some weight. All in all, there are different causes behind these people’s discontent, but the common ground is that they attribute the wrongs of our society to the failure of elite leadership. (more…)

Video–How to Sell the Story: St. Mark’s Beyond the Classroom

By Drew D’Orsi, V Form

Video–How to Sell the Story: St. Mark’s Beyond the Classroom

Screenshot 2017-03-06 18.00.47

Click on Image for the Video

In my fall St. Mark’s Saturdays course, “How to Sell the Story,” the Admission Office assigned the class a project to create a short admission video. Throughout this experience, we learned how a school sells its product of education and how it engages prospective students and families in order to “sell the story.” My group approached this project by thinking about what sets St. Mark’s apart from other prep schools. What immediately came to mind was the people of St. Mark’s and the opportunities that we have outside of the academic curriculum. Therefore, we came up with the idea of “St. Mark’s: Beyond the Classroom.” My group members (Lizzie Provost, LaQuan Mckever, Kaela Dunne, Jeff Koo) and I were pleasantly surprised that just within our small, five-person group were were able to discover such diversity and to have each member articulate a different aspect of our school community.

Click here or image above for video! (more…)