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Macbeth: Movie Poster Project

By Kristy Chen, III Form

Macbeth: Movie Poster Project

Act 1, Scene 3, Lines 157-159,

“If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me Without my stir.”

Act 2, Scene 1, Lines 44-61,

“Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand?”

Act 3, Scene 2, Lines 25-29,

“Duncan is in his grave. After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well. Treason has done his worst; nor steel nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further.”

 

Artist’s Statement: 

The illustration on the movie poster portrays Macbeth holding a dagger dripping with blood. Lady Macbeth’s face appears over Macbeth, who wears a bloody crown. Macbeth is the (more…)

Reflection on Wedding of Zein by Tayeb Salih

By Lora Xie, IV Form

Reflection on Wedding of Zein by Tayeb Salih

Both Haneen and the Imam are important religious leaders in the village’s spiritual life. The-Wedding-of-Zein_2048x2048While Haneen, a Sufi master, represents the mystery of Islam, the Imam represents the traditions and doctrines of Islam. However, both of them bring God into the village life.

Haneen enjoys unanimous respect from the villagers because he is ascetic, enigmatic, and accredited with the year’s miracles, the most prominent of which being stopping Zein from killing Seif ad-Din and turning Seif ad-Din from a wastrel to a pious Muslim. Haneen also correctly prophesied Zein’s marriage with “the best girl in the village” (64). The marvels’ magic cause even the secular people, such as the “gang,” to admire in awe. Through his unpredictable, spectacular, and uplifting miracles, Haneen gives the humdrum village life a heart-warming magnificence that can derive from nothing but a loving and powerful superior. He strengthens people’s awareness, appreciation, and awe for God by becoming a vessel for the higher power’s love and greatness himself. (more…)

An Argument for Utilitarianism: Omelas

By Jenny Tang, IV Form 

An Argument for Utilitarianism: Omelas

The 1973 short story “The Ones Who Walked Away from Omelas” presents the fictional town of Omelas whose citizens’ happiness, for an unchangeable reason, depends wholly on the grave suffering of one child, whom they trap in a cellar. After learning about this child, some Omelans oppose the idea by walking away, while others accept and stay.
 Citizens of Omelas should accept the situation and stay because it maximizes the collective happiness.

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Blade Runner: A Bipolar Fantasy

By Mo Liu, VI Form

Blade Runner: A Bipolar Fantasy

Introduction

Blade-Runner-LB-685x1024When Ridley Scott released his original Blade Runner in June 1982, the United States had just arrived at another peak of tension with the Soviet Union. Ronald Reagan had recently become President, and he denounced the policy of detente that previously dominated the U.S. foreign relations approach and wanted to re-establish the United States’ fierce international appearance. Reagan devised an ambitious plan to actively contain communism that historians would later refer to as “Reagan’s Second Cold War,” in which he called for an overt attempt to destruct the Soviet Union. After a short time-out, Americans once again found themselves in the war of tug with the Soviets, watching out for Soviet spies and waiting for the siren to alarm them of an approaching nuclear warhead. (more…)

Counterculture & The Graduate and its Soundtrack by “Simon & Garfunkel”

By Helynna Lin, VI Form

 

Counterculture & The Graduate and Its Soundtrack by “Simon & Garfunkel”

I. Introduction

The term Counterculture refers to a set of movements, ideal, and practices that emerged in the American culture between the 1960s and the 1970s. The counterculture was largely a response to the Cold War’s effects on the American society, and there were four core beliefs. First, advocates for counterculture rejected capitalism, for they believed that western corporates used Cold War politics to expand their markets worldwide and gain a larger profit. Second, in response to the rise of uniformity, counterculture rejected conformism and encouraged individuals to break the shackles of society’s expectations. Third, the rise of individualism caused an emergence of sexual liberation and experimentation as a movement against the traditional family model. Finally, the counterculture was mainly supported by the teenage generation, who came up with the slogan “don’t trust people over 30”.[1] [2]

Mike Nichol’s The Graduate (1967) is a bildungsroman that illustrates the transition from teenage years to adulthood of the protagonist, Benjamin Braddock. The movie’s soundtrack features many songs by “Simon & Garfunkel”, a folk-rock duo formed by Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel. (more…)

Creating an Online News Source in Writing Workshop

By Emma Viens, IV Form

Creating an Online News Source in Writing Workshop

Editor’s Note: For this assignment, students were tasked with creating an online news source format in a personalized genre/style/theme. It required seven articles, including an editorial, MLA citations, and sections. A title with a pun on their names was encouraged (hence Emma’s title!).

Click here or on any image to see the full News Source.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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