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What My Brain Learned via the Dissection of Another

By Julian Yang, V Form

What My Brain Learned via the Dissection of Another

Before walking into class on Monday, I was filled with curiosity and excitement. It has been six years since I saw an actual brain, and I was barely engaged at that time – although there was a parent who worked with brains and explained the information to us, no actual dissection was involved. The closest I got was holding the brain in my hand

My anticipation began to build during the “instructing” phase. Two feelings stirred inside me: one, I would be able to see everything that I learned in the past two weeks, and two, I was going to feel like a surgeon while using the scalpel. I made sure, however, to be careful: the way it sliced during Ms. Lohwater’s demonstration was enough to curb my excitement. (more…)

CAR T Cell–Giving Cancer Patients New Hope

By Grant Gattuso and Frank Hua, VI Form

CAR T Cell–Giving Cancer Patients New Hope

This past summer we had the opportunity to work in a cancer research lab in Seattle for four weeks— a very unique experience, especially for high schoolers.  We worked in Dr. Michael Jensen’s ‘82 lab in the Ben Towne Center For Childhood Cancer Research, which is affiliated with Seattle Children’s Hospital. The lab focuses on CAR T Cell, a immunotherapy that gives cancer patients a new hope. (more…)

Treating AAA (Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms)

By Megan Christy, VI Form

Treating AAA (Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms)

I am captivated by one particularly compelling question: how can we manipulate the body so it fixes itself? Could a combination of biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering be the answer?

I began exploring this question in the summer of 2017 while participating in a biomedical engineering program at Boston Leadership Institute. There, I applied this question to the way in which we treat aneurysms. Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are a “silent killer.” They form when the walls of a blood vessel weaken and are difficult to diagnose due to the lack of symptoms prior to rupture.[1] Once ruptured, AAAs have a mortality rate of 90%.[2] When an unruptured AAA is diagnosed, it is vitally important to treat it in a minimally invasive and lasting manner. (more…)

Autism-Vaccine Controversy: Video

By Izzy Kim & Riya Shankar, VI Form and Haley Dion & Laura Drepanos, V Form

Autism-Vaccine Controversy: Video

Editors’ Note: In Advanced Biology, students were encouraged to tell the story that they felt compelled to relate about their Public Health issue (click here for assignment).  In this video, the students integrated a given Case Study with relevant information gathered through independent research. Their integration of the Case Study with additional research reflects an advanced understanding of, and ability to convey, scientific content.

Click on Image for Video

 

Diminishing the Diversity of Devastating Diarrhea

By Geetika Surapaneni, Frances Hornbostel, & Graham Butterfield, III Form with Will Figueroa, V Form

Diminishing the Diversity of Devastating Diarrhea

Please click the image to download/see the poster. Scroll below to see each individual piece.

CLICK ON EACH IMAGE BELOW TO ZOOM TO EACH PIECE OF PROJECT. (more…)

Melatonin’s Effect on Learning and Memory in a Tauopathy Model of Alzheimer’s Disease in Drosophila melanogaster

By Sophie Haugen and Sada Nichols-Worley, VI Form

Melatonin’s Effect on Learning and Memory in a Tauopathy Model of Alzheimer’s Disease in Drosophila melanogaster

Abstract

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes devastating memory loss and cognitive decline in humans. There is no current cure for AD. Research studies show that oxidative stress is correlated to and possibly a cause of this neurodegeneration. Because antioxidants such as melatonin have been found to reduce oxidative stress, melatonin could alleviate neurodegeneration and serve as an effective dietary supplement for people with with AD. In this experiment, a tauopathy Drosophila melanogaster group

Please click on the image to download/see the poster. Zoom in to read specifics.

that express human tau (MAPT) under gal4in neurons were used to model AD in humans. This study measured learning and memory of the Drosophila through an olfactory vortex learning assay in a t-maze. Groups of flies with and without melatonin supplementation were tested in the t-maze. Following experimentation and data collection, preliminary results from this study suggest, but do not confirm, that melatonin reduces memory loss and improves cognitive function in a Drosophila AD model. Further trials are needed to confirm the suggested results.

Click here for full LAB REPORT. (more…)