LEO

Home » Posts tagged 'STEM'

Tag Archives: STEM

Evolution and Revolutions in Physics (with Tiki-Toki)

By Tony Banson, Colton Bullard, John Cho, Thayer Cornell, Alan Gao, Jovin Ho, Izzy Kim, Ivy Li, Helynna Lin, Sada Nichols-Worley, Cooper Schmitz, Jonathan Shakespeare, Leon Shi, Alex Song, Alan Yang, Justin Zhang

Evolution and Revolutions in Physics (with Tiki-Toki)

Editors’ Note: In “Advanced Physics: Modern Topics in Physics,” the class is collaborating on a “Timeline” of physics, utilizing the online tool Tiki-Toki. The timeline is an ongoing work in progress throughout the course, hence moments, details, and explanations are added as completed.

Click on the image or here to go the Tiki-Toki site for the timeline.

The best way to view it is as a 3D “highway (look for the round 3d button on the lower left of your screen), but it is also visible as a conventional 2D side-scrolling timeline. (more…)

The Blueprint Hackathon and Finding Your Scientist Doppelgänger

By Luc Coté, Filip Kierzenka, Connor Browder, V Form and Jason Chen, IV Form

The Blueprint Hackathon and Finding Your Scientist Doppelgänger

On February 17th and 18th, the annual Blueprint Hackathon was held at MIT. You may wonder what exactly a Hackathon is, and we certainly wouldn’t blame you. A Hackathon is essentially a “Hacking” Convention, although “Hacking” is used very liberally to make the name sound cooler than “Computer Science” Convention. On the first day, we had the Learnathon, which is devoted entirely to learning about computer science, specifically about App Development, Web Design, or Basics of Coding. Taking the Web Design course, we learned a lot about a style of programming our JAVA based classes have not exposed us to.

The first day was an appetizer of new knowledge. The second day gave the main course: The Buildathon. This is where we put our knowledge to the test, working as a team to create a final project in 9 hours. Our idea was to build a program that matches a user’s face to a famous scientist doppelgänger. (more…)

Hypoxia: The Forming of Dead Zones

By Rosanna Zhao, V Form, Mary Hoffman, VI Form, and Claire O’Brien, VI Form

Hypoxia: The Forming of Dead Zones

Infographic: https://infograph.venngage.com/ps/l35FghyQ4DM/dead-zone-project

A “Dead Zone” is a region in the ocean in which oxygen concentrations are too low to support healthy marine life. This phenomenon of insufficient oxygen levels is known as hypoxia. Hypoxia is associated with the overabundance of algae which can lead to oxygen deficiency when they cover the water surface and disallow photosynthesis to occur within plants beneath the water. Once a vast body of water becomes hypoxic and oxygen levels drop below 2 ppm DO, a dead zone is formed.

Dead zones occur near coastal regions because the cause of formation is primarily linked with eutrophication. Eutrophication is defined by an excess of nutrient pollution in an open body of water, causing death of animal life due to a deficiency of oxygen. Although nutrients are good for fertilizing plants, nutrient pollution is detrimental to the ocean because it causes chances in the marine ecosystem, resulting in deaths of animals. During the spring and the summer, heavy rain washes nutrients containing nitrogen and phosphorus that farmers use to fertilize their land into streams and rivers. Once these nutrients flow into coastal areas, they stimulate the growth of algae. (more…)

Bee Keeping & Legitimately Fun Facts About Bees!

By Reily Scott, III Form

Bee Keeping & Legitimately Fun Facts About Bees!

Ever since kindergarten, I have been beekeeping with my mother, but we aren’t the first in our family. Our beekeeping tradition goes back four generations to my great-grandmother Charlotte Ames, but I am the first male beekeeper in my family. My sister, on the other hand, does not want to involve herself with bugs in any way. She will go days without using her bathroom if there is a ladybug somewhere inside.

 

I  have loved bugs all my life. When I was three or four years old, I would find stinkbugs, because my old house had an abundance of them, and stuff them in my matchbox cars and drive them around town. Though I couldn’t get my hands on bees to put them in cars, I still loved them anyway. (more…)

Studio I Art: Zoanthids and Coral

By Charlotte Bertsch, III Form

Studio I Art:  Zoanthids and Coral

Zoanthids live on rocky and rubbly areas in flat intertidal zones. This particular kind of zoanthid, zoanthus sociatus, can be found on the highest part of the intertidal zone, which means that the coral is located in a middle ground between tide marks and is underwater during high tide and above water during low tide. The other kinds of zoanthids live on the upper levels in the lower surf zone, which indicates that they are located in the region where waves break. (more…)

Math Modeling: Protein Bars Ranking Project

By Helynna Lin and Tommy MacNeil, VI Form

Math Modeling: Protein Bars Ranking Project

Click HERE to read Tommy and Helynna’s math modeling writeup report and analysis of which protein bars are the best. They considered nutrition facts and developed a formula that “scored” each bar on its ability to help someone effectively gain muscle mass.

(more…)