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From The Writers’ Room: Extracurricular, An Original TV Series

By Riya Shankar, Lulu Eastman, Lillian Stout, Cooper Giblin, Tony Banson, Nick Hallal, Sophie Haugen, Sada Nichols-Worley, Ben Hunnewell, and Jimmy Tobin, VI Form

From The Writers’ Room: Extracurricular, An Original TV Series

(Above title sequence scene: music composed and played by Riya Shankar & Sophie Haugen)

Check out Extracurricular’s fan website here: https://extracurricular.squarespace.com

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Macroeconomics: “Easy Key” Product for Campus Safety and Convenience

By Colin Boylan and Jonathan Noel, VI Form

 

Macroeconomics: “Easy Key” Product for Campus Safety and Convenience

Editor’s Note: As a final project in Macroeconomics, students had to find an issue within St. Mark’s and the world and then find the solution to it by “creating” a product. They had to find the costs associated with making the startup business, pitch the idea to Mr. Rob Calagione, and ask the venture capitalist for money in exchange for royalty.

On American educational campuses and specifically the St. Mark’s campus, campus safety and individual convenience are issues. All campus buildings are now being locked for safety reasons, but unfortunately, this is leaving students and faculty locked out of the buildings as well. Yes, key cards are a solution. However key cards are easily forgotten or lost, are likely to be broken, and are simply outdated. Our product, Easy Key, addresses both issues by providing students with a convenient way to access locked buildings in addition to allowing students to pay for school products. (more…)

Autism-Vaccine Controversy: Video

By Izzy Kim & Riya Shankar, VI Form and Haley Dion & Laura Drepanos, V Form

Autism-Vaccine Controversy: Video

Editors’ Note: In Advanced Biology, students were encouraged to tell the story that they felt compelled to relate about their Public Health issue (click here for assignment).  In this video, the students integrated a given Case Study with relevant information gathered through independent research. Their integration of the Case Study with additional research reflects an advanced understanding of, and ability to convey, scientific content.

Click on Image for Video

 

Diminishing the Diversity of Devastating Diarrhea

By Geetika Surapaneni, Frances Hornbostel, & Graham Butterfield, III Form with Will Figueroa, V Form

Diminishing the Diversity of Devastating Diarrhea

Please click the image to download/see the poster. Scroll below to see each individual piece.

CLICK ON EACH IMAGE BELOW TO ZOOM TO EACH PIECE OF PROJECT. (more…)

Biology: Membrane Structure and Function

By Alex Cardonick, V Form

 

Biology: Membrane Structure and Function

Editors’ Note: In Advanced Biology, students are often evaluated on the reflection of their learning process. They constantly ask themselves questions that demonstrate advanced scholarship such as “How am I connecting each part of my learning into a flowing story?” and “What do I still not understand?” This form of deep reflection is summarized in each student’s ePortfolio at the end of a unit, which includes several different Learning Outcomes ranging from “Dynamic Homeostasis” to “The Central Dogma of Biology.” These Learning Outcomes are often present throughout multiple units, and therefore challenges the students to synthesize information across different areas of focus.

Linked here is Alex Cardonick’s ePortfolio on Learning Outcome 6: Membrane Structure and Function, including four Artifacts of Learning, including text, video, and images.

Introductory Narrative:

Cell membranes act as the “guards” of the cell. Membranes’ structure consists of phospholipids tightly knitted together by their hydrophobic tails, with the hydrophilic heads sticking out on either side. This phospholipid bilayer structure makes membranes semi-permeable; they let small, non-polar molecules such as water and carbon dioxide in, while keeping out large and polar substances such as starch and Iodide anions. In addition, cell membranes can be modified to help cells perform specific functions. Proteins added into the phospholipid structure can create transport channels for molecules that cannot travel through the membrane itself, such as Na+ ions in the nerve impulse. These ions allow a neuron to send a signal in the form of an action potential. Furthermore, molecules and ions can even move against the concentration gradient by active transport when a transport protein and outside energy are provided. This type of movement across a membrane allows essential functions such as the repolarization of the nerve impulse to occur when Sodium-Potassium pumps “reset” the nerve impulse to its resting membrane potential by moving the ions against the concentration gradient. (more…)

Leadership from All Directions – The Collaborative Effort of Lion Term

By Liz McCulloch, Director of Lion Term and French Faculty

 

Leadership from All Directions – The Collaborative Effort of Lion Term

Editors’ Note: This piece originally appeared in the gcLi’s Leadership blog on 2 April. You can further seek the Gardner Carney Leadership Institute on Facebook by clicking here.

Last Spring, our entire community experienced the first ever St. Mark’s Lion Term, a two-week experiential education program that ends the school year. During Lion Term, each grade has its own unique focus and all 10th grade students work with local organizations to promote community engagement. We adopted a modified version of the African Leadership Academy’s BUILD model, a form of design-thinking adapted for social entrepreneurship. The ideas were iterated and tested first, and students came away with the confidence that working together, they can play a role in their communities.

One of my favorite stories from last year’s Lion Term involves a group of 10th grade students who worked at Daniel’s Table, an organization committed to ending hunger in Framingham, MA and beyond. After volunteering to serve meals and talking to the founders and clients at Daniel’s Table, our group recognized that it would be helpful to list the ingredients in multiple languages for those who do not speak English or who are not familiar with the local produce. The group decided to make laminated cards with ingredients in English, Spanish, and Portuguese on one side and recipe ideas on the back. In working to understand the needs that the organization was meeting, our students were able to offer a solution that helped the organization to improve its service. (more…)