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Macbeth: Movie Poster Project

By Kristy Chen, III Form

Macbeth: Movie Poster Project

Act 1, Scene 3, Lines 157-159,

“If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me Without my stir.”

Act 2, Scene 1, Lines 44-61,

“Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand?”

Act 3, Scene 2, Lines 25-29,

“Duncan is in his grave. After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well. Treason has done his worst; nor steel nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further.”

 

Artist’s Statement: 

The illustration on the movie poster portrays Macbeth holding a dagger dripping with blood. Lady Macbeth’s face appears over Macbeth, who wears a bloody crown. Macbeth is the (more…)

Studio Art Concentration: Interpretations of Snakes

By Rosanna Zhao, V Form

Studio Art Concentration: Interpretations of Snakes

Growing up as a devout Christian, I always found myself looking at snakes in a negative light; they represented sin and temptation, luring man and woman to take a bite from the fruit that ruined their lives forever. However, as I became increasingly fascinated by the fashion world, a new representation of snakes enlightened me. Wrapped around models and flashing in bold reds and yellows, snakes became a more regal and daring creature in my eyes. Inspired by the two drastically different images of snakes, I focused my Advanced Studio Art concentration on the distinct interpretations of snakes in different time periods and cultures.

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Studio I Art: Zoanthids and Coral

By Charlotte Bertsch, III Form

Studio I Art:  Zoanthids and Coral

Zoanthids live on rocky and rubbly areas in flat intertidal zones. This particular kind of zoanthid, zoanthus sociatus, can be found on the highest part of the intertidal zone, which means that the coral is located in a middle ground between tide marks and is underwater during high tide and above water during low tide. The other kinds of zoanthids live on the upper levels in the lower surf zone, which indicates that they are located in the region where waves break. (more…)

How the Adolescent Brain Works: In Annotated Diagrams

By Hannah Hassara, Katherine Gao, Kennedy Petties, Ryan Yang, Mary Flathers, Nathan Laudani, Cecily Bradley, David Ragone, Caitlin Lochhead, Teresa Meyer, and Steven Sinchi, V Form

How the Adolescent Brain Works: In Annotated Diagrams


Editor’s Note:
In the culminating assignment of the Biology 30 unit on Learning and the Brain, the students created Annotated Diagrams of their brains and how their brains learn new information. An Annotated Diagram is a formal sketchnote that aims to demonstrate understanding of the information by demonstrating how the information was processed. The following question was posed: “How might the fact that you are an adolescent help you craft learning strategies that work for you and are effective?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scroll down for large images of the Annotated Diagrams. (more…)

A Portrait of This Artist’s Portraiture

By Lulu Eastman, VI Form

A Portrait of This Artist’s Portraiture

This year in Studio III, my AP concentration is portraiture. I love to convey images of humans in my art, whether they are real people that I know personally or figures from my imagination. In my portraits, I capture the subject’s personality or identity to share this aspect with the viewer. The most common mediums I use in my art are pencil, colored pencil, and acrylic paints. (more…)

Drawing a Blank! Lessons from Studio I Art Class

By Mrs. Barbara Putnam & Her Studio I Class

Drawing a Blank! Lessons from Studio I Art Class

What is it like to see with eyes that learn to notice everything, including what is in between bits of information?  What about trying to draw with your non-dominant hand? These are two assignments for Studio I students. Whether you have never risked drawing or have taken many art courses, it is worth remembering what it is like to begin in any discipline.

Frances Hornbostel ‘21

In the first assignment,  “Hard Lines,” students learned that different line widths communicate differently in how we perceive  not only a shape but also how “gray” it is. Each student had to randomly pencil out areas to explore these line types while leaving several shapes “blank” or white. One of the areas needed to be drawn directly in felt tip pen with the non-dominant hand… which means that it will be permanent because pen is not erasable. Shaky lines remind us of what it was like when we first began to hold a pencil years ago and how your brain needed to communicate instructions over and over to get your hand to “work.” The white spaces tell us that a shape can be made by the end points of other lines, which is a concept lifted from Geometry. 

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