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Examples of Experiences in Chinese Class

Examples of Experiences in Chinese Class

From Ms. Yuhong Xu: “My main pedagogical approach is teaching vocabulary, grammar, and speaking. I focus a lot on speaking, and my students are able to speak and communicate with a stronger confidence in and outside of class.”

On speaking by Caroline Sullivan (III Form): “Speaking is the most important part of learning Chinese. Although learning grammar and new vocab is essential to becoming fluent in Chinese, speaking and being able to communicate in the language is most important. If students only study Chinese grammar, they will never be able to make use of the language and communicate with their Chinese peers. By practicing speaking in class every day, I am making progress in mastering the language.”

Click on the image for a video of conversation in action.

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Preservation of Metaphor in Translation: Analyzing the Chinese Poet Su Shi

By Yangfan Helynna Lin, VI Form 

Preservation of Metaphor in Translation: Analyzing the Chinese Poet Su Shi

“Bad translations communicate too much” (1). In After Babel, George Steiner points out that a bad translation strips the original text of something important by unnecessarily applying new elements to the original text. In English translations of Chinese poems, one type of bad translation attempts at over-explaining the metaphors, or metaphorical objects, in the poem, which puts readers at the risk of accessing less information that the metaphor otherwise would have presented to the reader- – that is, a fuller image that the poem originally presents.

Let’s compare the following two translations of the same poem: Nian Nu Jiao: Chi Bi Huai Gu by Chinese poet Su Shi (2). *Literally translated into “Nian Nu Jiao: At Chi Bi Cherishing the Past”, with which Nian Nu Jiao is the tune that the poem rhymes.

念奴娇(赤壁怀古) 苏轼

大江东去,浪淘尽、千古风流人物。故垒西边,人道是、三国周郎赤壁。乱石穿空,惊涛拍岸,卷起千堆雪。江山如画,一时多少豪杰。

遥想公瑾当年,小乔初嫁了,雄姿英发。羽扇纶巾,谈笑间、樯虏灰飞烟灭。故国神游,多情应笑我,早生华发。人生如梦,一尊还酹江月。 (more…)

A Presentation and Role Play in Chinese Classes

By Helen Huang and Amy Kim, III Form [Chinese II] & Soo Bin (Josh) Lee and Shep Greene, VI Form [Chinese IV]

Editor’s Note: from Rubo Fu, St. Mark’s faculty member–“In Chinese class, presentations and role plays require students to use vocabulary and grammar rules they have learned to create their own stories or give opinions. This allows them to develop creativity and have a better experience using the language.” 

Click on Image below for “Directional Complements” slide show in Chinese II

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Click on Image below for a role play video of dialogue (transcript below) in Chinese IV

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The Art of Calligraphy

By Sean Kim, VI Form

The Art of Calligraphy

IMG_2367As the Western Hemisphere settles down from all the hubbub of the new year, many nations in East Asia and their diaspora communities recently celebrated their new year: the Lunar New Year. Even with all the “westernization,” celebrating holidays based on the lunar calendar and tradition that come with the holidays have stayed an integral part of communities throughout East Asia and beyond. One of the traditions of the holidays is calligraphy. Calligraphy, which began as a crude pictogram in Ancient China, has been considered a work of art for millennia. Just as art did, calligraphy in East Asia developed and evolved, spawning numerous styles of writing that came and went as centuries passed. (more…)