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20% Time Project: Gardening–The Long Process of Planting

By Eve Elkins, III Form

20% Time Project: Gardening–The Long Process of Planting

Editors’ Note: In Ms. Amanda Hultin’s III Form English classes, her students pursue 20% Time (or “Genius Hour”) projects. Some essential elements include taking control of one’s own learning, choosing an individual topic, deciding how to learn and to produce a public product, and reflecting on the process.

Click on image to view Eve’s Padlet.

Reflection on learning:

*What content/information did you learn during this project?

I learned about gardening. I learned that the perfect time to water the plants is in the afternoon. If you water them at night or early morning, they are more likely to grow fungus. I also learned that snap peas, which was the vegetable I was growing, grow best in mid-spring, which was when we started this project. They also have the quickest growing rate which was about two months. That is how I came to choose snap peas. When I contacted the manager of Chestnut Hill Farms, I was able to find out about the evolution about gardening. Now, in current times, gardening has shifted to being grown indoors all year round. Gardening used to be seasonal but now, due to modern technology, there have been trucks and trailers developed to sustain plants even in winter. Lots of people still garden but the way we do it has changed. (more…)

Biology: Membrane Structure and Function

By Alex Cardonick, V Form

 

Biology: Membrane Structure and Function

Editors’ Note: In Advanced Biology, students are often evaluated on the reflection of their learning process. They constantly ask themselves questions that demonstrate advanced scholarship such as “How am I connecting each part of my learning into a flowing story?” and “What do I still not understand?” This form of deep reflection is summarized in each student’s ePortfolio at the end of a unit, which includes several different Learning Outcomes ranging from “Dynamic Homeostasis” to “The Central Dogma of Biology.” These Learning Outcomes are often present throughout multiple units, and therefore challenges the students to synthesize information across different areas of focus.

Linked here is Alex Cardonick’s ePortfolio on Learning Outcome 6: Membrane Structure and Function, including four Artifacts of Learning, including text, video, and images.

Introductory Narrative:

Cell membranes act as the “guards” of the cell. Membranes’ structure consists of phospholipids tightly knitted together by their hydrophobic tails, with the hydrophilic heads sticking out on either side. This phospholipid bilayer structure makes membranes semi-permeable; they let small, non-polar molecules such as water and carbon dioxide in, while keeping out large and polar substances such as starch and Iodide anions. In addition, cell membranes can be modified to help cells perform specific functions. Proteins added into the phospholipid structure can create transport channels for molecules that cannot travel through the membrane itself, such as Na+ ions in the nerve impulse. These ions allow a neuron to send a signal in the form of an action potential. Furthermore, molecules and ions can even move against the concentration gradient by active transport when a transport protein and outside energy are provided. This type of movement across a membrane allows essential functions such as the repolarization of the nerve impulse to occur when Sodium-Potassium pumps “reset” the nerve impulse to its resting membrane potential by moving the ions against the concentration gradient. (more…)

Evolution and Revolutions in Physics (with Tiki-Toki)

By Tony Banson, Colton Bullard, John Cho, Thayer Cornell, Alan Gao, Jovin Ho, Izzy Kim, Ivy Li, Helynna Lin, Sada Nichols-Worley, Cooper Schmitz, Jonathan Shakespeare, Leon Shi, Alex Song, Alan Yang, Justin Zhang

Evolution and Revolutions in Physics (with Tiki-Toki)

Editors’ Note: In “Advanced Physics: Modern Topics in Physics,” the class is collaborating on a “Timeline” of physics, utilizing the online tool Tiki-Toki. The timeline is an ongoing work in progress throughout the course, hence moments, details, and explanations are added as completed.

Click on the image or here to go the Tiki-Toki site for the timeline.

The best way to view it is as a 3D “highway (look for the round 3d button on the lower left of your screen), but it is also visible as a conventional 2D side-scrolling timeline. (more…)

Hypoxia: The Forming of Dead Zones

By Rosanna Zhao, V Form, Mary Hoffman, VI Form, and Claire O’Brien, VI Form

Hypoxia: The Forming of Dead Zones

Infographic: https://infograph.venngage.com/ps/l35FghyQ4DM/dead-zone-project

A “Dead Zone” is a region in the ocean in which oxygen concentrations are too low to support healthy marine life. This phenomenon of insufficient oxygen levels is known as hypoxia. Hypoxia is associated with the overabundance of algae which can lead to oxygen deficiency when they cover the water surface and disallow photosynthesis to occur within plants beneath the water. Once a vast body of water becomes hypoxic and oxygen levels drop below 2 ppm DO, a dead zone is formed.

Dead zones occur near coastal regions because the cause of formation is primarily linked with eutrophication. Eutrophication is defined by an excess of nutrient pollution in an open body of water, causing death of animal life due to a deficiency of oxygen. Although nutrients are good for fertilizing plants, nutrient pollution is detrimental to the ocean because it causes chances in the marine ecosystem, resulting in deaths of animals. During the spring and the summer, heavy rain washes nutrients containing nitrogen and phosphorus that farmers use to fertilize their land into streams and rivers. Once these nutrients flow into coastal areas, they stimulate the growth of algae. (more…)

Bee Keeping & Legitimately Fun Facts About Bees!

By Reily Scott, III Form

Bee Keeping & Legitimately Fun Facts About Bees!

Ever since kindergarten, I have been beekeeping with my mother, but we aren’t the first in our family. Our beekeeping tradition goes back four generations to my great-grandmother Charlotte Ames, but I am the first male beekeeper in my family. My sister, on the other hand, does not want to involve herself with bugs in any way. She will go days without using her bathroom if there is a ladybug somewhere inside.

 

I  have loved bugs all my life. When I was three or four years old, I would find stinkbugs, because my old house had an abundance of them, and stuff them in my matchbox cars and drive them around town. Though I couldn’t get my hands on bees to put them in cars, I still loved them anyway. (more…)

Studio I Art: Zoanthids and Coral

By Charlotte Bertsch, III Form

Studio I Art:  Zoanthids and Coral

Zoanthids live on rocky and rubbly areas in flat intertidal zones. This particular kind of zoanthid, zoanthus sociatus, can be found on the highest part of the intertidal zone, which means that the coral is located in a middle ground between tide marks and is underwater during high tide and above water during low tide. The other kinds of zoanthids live on the upper levels in the lower surf zone, which indicates that they are located in the region where waves break. (more…)