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Voice in Guitar and in Literature…and in Me

By Shep Greene, VI Form

Voice in Guitar and in Literature…and in Me

The guitar is an integral part of who I am. As my skill has progressed, I’ve seen my appreciation and understanding of music progress as well. Over this past year, I began to delve into a more abstract form of music in improvisation. Within this form of my guitar playing, I began to find striking similarities between music and literature. Imagine every note as a letter and every note coming together to form a riff, with all of the respective letters coming together as one word. By the end of a piece, just as by the end of a novel, you’ll have a powerful message to send out to your listeners and readers. (more…)

Shakespeare’s The Tempest: Missing Piece Storyboards

By Daisy Williams, Steven Landry, Teagan Ladner, Grace Gorman, Sam Lauten, Riley Lochhead, Jess Adams, Tracy LeBlanc, Maeve McCuine, Caroline Bailey, and Kahler Mabbs, VI Form

Shakespeare’s The Tempest: Missing Piece Storyboards

Between Season Three and Season Four of LOST, the writers (for ABC and in screenshot-2016-10-25-00-00-59conjunction with Verizon) produced 13 short (< 4 minutes) “mobisodes” or “webisodes” that divulged scenes that didn’t appear in the first three seasons, but yet were considered part of the canonical narrative. These were called “Missing Pieces.” In Getting LOST, students were assigned to create a four-panel storyboard of a “Missing Piece” from Shakespeare’s The Tempest that they could imagine and create to be part of any aspect of the story from any point in history (from 5000 years ago to the unseen elements of Shakespeare’s plot to the present day ramifications of the characters’ actions). The storyboard–a graphic illustration that previews what would be staged or filmed by actors–could be crafted in any format or program.

Below are the varied storyboards created. Keep scrolling! (more…)

Reviving Ophelia’s Song

By Sam Sarafin, V Form

Reviving Ophelia’s Song

What happens to a life so battered and bruised under the gift wrap of perfection? What happens to a life

Beilfuss-Ophelia-24x36 whose opportunities have been seized by another, whose ideals and self-importance are plucked out of fingertips before they even left a print? In the play Hamlet by William Shakespeare, Ophelia is often depicted as well-composed and sophisticated. When Ophelia sings a song before her death, she can attribute the meaning of the lyrics to one feeling or event – most often, this meaning is madness or grief. While Ophelia sang this song to convey her distress, there are many hidden meanings in the lyrics. Ophelia’s song is not an expression of one event or one feeling – it is the verbalization of grief over Polonius and Hamlet and a scrutiny of Gertrude’s portrayal of love. In it, Ophelia laments about patriarchal society and the way she had been controlled and used. (more…)

Anatomy of a Course: Getting LOST

Anatomy of a Course: Getting LOST

By John Camp, English Department Head 

mrcamp@stmarksschool.org

Twitter: @gettinglostcamp

jack_eye101In September of 2004, commercials ran for a new fall show on ABC called LOST. As a self-ascribed t.v. critic (and an acerbically judgmental one at that), I remember distinctly and succinctly saying to my wife Tara, “That looks stupid.” Interestingly, when Lloyd Braun, then the head of ABC, pitched the idea at aTitle Logo network retreat, virtually all ABC execs had the same reaction that I had. Senior vice president Thom Sherman, however, was intrigued and pursued the idea with Braun and the writer Jeffrey Lieber. Through a few stages of scripting, Braun’s original idea became LOST–driven by J.J. Abrams and Damon Lindelof, and eventually Lindelof and Carleton Cuse. In the summer of 2006, friends of mine implored me to watch the show, saying that they knew I, specifically, would love it. So, I borrowed the Season 1 box set, and Tara and I sat down to watch at least the pilot episode. From the initial moment of protagonist Jack’s eye opening and its inherent symbolism (Eye of Horus, the Mind’s I, gateway to the soul), the mythology intrigued me and binge watching, of course, ensued. From those origins, LOST became a literal religion for me as well as the inspiration for what I consider to be the magnus opus of my teaching career, my course “Getting LOST.” (more…)

Three Weeks in English Teacher Heaven — Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre

By Jeniene Matthews, English Faculty

 

GlobeWhat happens when you bring together 25 passionate, talented, and eager teachers of English and Drama?  What happens when that diverse group of people works nonstop in and around The Globe Theatre — one of the most significant performance spaces on the planet?  You get magic.

The magic comes from the building itself.  Conceived, built, rebuilt, and rebuilt again, the Globe Theatre was the vessel that brought Shakespeare’s genius to the people. Learning its history — and living it and becoming a small part of it — has a way of changing us.

(more…)

Two IV Form Othello Essays: “Iago the Gardner” & “Emilia: Feminist Wisdom

By Allegra Forbes, IV Form, and Claudia Chung, IV Form

Allegra–“Iago the Gardener”:

A true villain invests time and care into his work, tending to his malevolent deeds tirelessly from whence they bloom in his mind to when they grow to be ripe and succulent. A true villain is as diligent as a gardener, scattering seeds of suspicion where he finds fertile soil, ripping out hindering weeds, irrigating his fields periodically, and even patiently waiting for nature to contribute its share. In Shakespeare’s play Othello, the scheming and fickle Iago proves to be a brilliant gardener, using the entire stage and cast as his plowed field. (more…)