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Tag Archives: Independent Projects

Autonomous Navigation and Decision-Making Process Using Machine and Deep Learning

By Jeongyong Chris Yang, VI Form

 

Autonomous Navigation and Decision-Making Process Using Machine Learning and Deep Learning

Abstract

Please click the image to download/see the poster. Zoom in to read specifics.

Autonomous vehicles are self-driving cars that do not require human drivers. They use sensors that are attached to the vehicle as their vision to detect their environment. After the vehicle detects other objects or signals, computer programming (coding) allows them to react to the situations adaptively. Even though the sensors do not need to be improved, the millions of situations the cars can face on roads create difficulties for people to build a sophisticated computer program that makes the autonomous vehicles completely safe on roads.

First, I decided to build an algorithm pseudocode to help resolve this problem. During this process, I built mazes and followed the instructions based on the algorithm manually to check whether the algorithm is effective. I mainly used three different models for my mazes, each with different difficulty levels to ensure that the algorithm works every time. Then, I decided to record the information (velocity and displacement for both x and y directions) about the vehicle on the map so that the following vehicles can get a picture of the map automatically. However, if the subsequent vehicle detects a different or an altered map with its sensors, the new information will also be recorded on the map. Finally, the final vehicle will follow the path set by the first vehicle, but the map will guide the car with the most efficient path after completely learning and optimizing the possible paths.

To read the full project write-up, CLICK HERE. (more…)

20% Time Project: Longest Time Balancing A Shoe Upside Down On Top Of Your Head

By Ian Moore, III Form

 

20% Time Project: Longest Time Balancing A Shoe Upside Down On Top Of Your Head

Editors’ Note: In Ms. Amanda Hultin’s III Form English classes, her students pursue 20% Time (or “Genius Hour”) projects. Some essential elements include taking control of one’s own learning, choosing an individual topic, deciding how to learn and to produce a public product, and reflecting on the process.

Click on image to experience Ian’s Weebly pages.

Click on this image to see Ian’s time-lapse with the shoe on his head!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection on learning:

*What content/information did you learn during this project?

I learned a lot of valuable information throughout this project.  First, I learned about breaking a world record. I now know that there are a couple different ways to break a world record.  First, you can apply on Guinness World Record to have an employee from their office come and watch you break the record.  Then, you may have the opportunity to get into the Guinness World Records book.  However, you can also do it online using a website called recordsetter.com.  This is a very useful website and is the one that I used for my record. It relies on videos to see if you actually break the record.  I also learned how to make a blog throughout this project.  I used weebly.com to make my blog.  It is a website that teaches you how to make and use a blog.  This was a fun and interactive public product to make.

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20% Time Project: Gardening–The Long Process of Planting

By Eve Elkins, III Form

20% Time Project: Gardening–The Long Process of Planting

Editors’ Note: In Ms. Amanda Hultin’s III Form English classes, her students pursue 20% Time (or “Genius Hour”) projects. Some essential elements include taking control of one’s own learning, choosing an individual topic, deciding how to learn and to produce a public product, and reflecting on the process.

Click on image to view Eve’s Padlet.

Reflection on learning:

*What content/information did you learn during this project?

I learned about gardening. I learned that the perfect time to water the plants is in the afternoon. If you water them at night or early morning, they are more likely to grow fungus. I also learned that snap peas, which was the vegetable I was growing, grow best in mid-spring, which was when we started this project. They also have the quickest growing rate which was about two months. That is how I came to choose snap peas. When I contacted the manager of Chestnut Hill Farms, I was able to find out about the evolution about gardening. Now, in current times, gardening has shifted to being grown indoors all year round. Gardening used to be seasonal but now, due to modern technology, there have been trucks and trailers developed to sustain plants even in winter. Lots of people still garden but the way we do it has changed. (more…)

Critical Review of EA’s Battlefront II: A Rebel with a Cause

By Charles Mosse, VI Form

Critical Review of EA’s Battlefront II: A Rebel with a Cause

Click on image below for Voice Over video essay:

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Poetry and The Intimacy of Writing

By Madeleine Wass, IV Form

Poetry and The Intimacy of Writing

Since a young age, I have loved writing. At first, it was a great pass time and then developed into a passion. I first learned about poetry in my sixth grade English class, and I then began to keep a journal with ramblings of words that, over time, began to string together. Ever since then, poetry has been with me through tough times. It comes to me the easiest when strong emotions run high, such as anger, sadness, or frustration. Poetry is a wonderful way to channel what I am feeling. My poems can come in many different forms; no way is the right way. For me, it is more about just being able to express what is going through my mind or something that has happened. I also use my poems to record and to remember the feelings I had during an event. When I place my pen on the paper, I just feel the thoughts in my head flowing out. Sometimes they are jumbled and other times they fit well together. My main goal is about capturing what I am feeling while escaping the weight of the world. The following excerpt is from a poem I wrote about a beautiful hike I went on: (more…)

Deep Work in Practice at St. Mark’s (Part 3)

By Dr. Colleen Worrell, Director of The Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning

Deep Work in Practice at St. Mark’s (Part 3)

Deep Work is a skill that the Center is hoping to build into each student’s “learning playbook.” The first two LEO articles (Make Deep Work Your Super Powerand Productivity, Neuroscience, & Deliberate Practice) aimed to introduce the term and core concepts to the St. Mark’s community. This third article focuses on deep work from the perspective of two St. Markers, 6th Former Sophie Haugen, and Classics teacher, Dr. Harwood. Each of them responded to the following questions:

  • What are some ways that you deliberately practice deep work at (or beyond) St. Mark’s?
  • What is the value of deep work?
  • What recommendations do you have for St. Marker’s who’d like get started with deep work?

Sophie Haugen, 6th Former:

I am not an expert on “doing” deep work, but I do try to practice it and I have learned about its importance, especially as a student at St. Mark’s where our schedules and lives are extremely packed and do not easily enable us to practice deep work all the time. Last year, I fell into a multi-month-long rut of frustration and lack of satisfaction from everything I was doing in my academic courses. I was putting in excessive time and what I perceived to be effort and hardwork but was not seeing the results in my grades or my actual understanding/engagement with the material. (more…)