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The West Nile Virus: The Minor Zoonotic Problem Without A Major Solution

By Anuoluwa Akibu, Jack Griffin, Sierra Petties, & Ben West, III Form; with mentors Ben Robb, V Form & Blaine Duffy, VI Form

The West Nile Virus: The Minor Zoonotic Problem Without A Major Solution

Abstract

In the information below, you will be able to take away a full understanding on the West Nile virus, and how it is transmitted zoonotically. West Nile virus (WNV) is a pathogen, specifically a flavivirus, and it is found in arthropods. West Nile virus infections are most common in temperate areas, between late summer and early fall, when mosquito activity is at it’s peak. Although many people become infected with WNV most people do not show symptoms. The few who do, mostly have minor symptoms like fever and headache. One percent of the people infected with the virus develop lethal symptoms that require immediate medical assistance. Most cases of West Nile virus come from mosquito bites. The mosquitoes infect humans and other animals which are called dead end hosts. Dead-end hosts cannot pass the disease on to another host. Birds however are different because they are amplifier hosts. That means they continue to spread the disease to mosquitoes have not received the virus yet. The only known treatment to West Nile virus at the moment is pain killers because scientists are still figuring out a solution. There are cures for animals and some in development for humans. There isn’t a practical solution to West Nile virus, but there have been prevention methods created. The main focus for many groups worldwide is of the disease by managing the mosquito population and observing the bird population to restrict the further spreading of the disease. Researcher(s): All;  Editor(s): All (more…)

Asians & Asian Americans: A “Model Minority”?

By Ivy Li, IV Form

Asians & Asian Americans: A “Model Minority”?

On April 9, I participated in a conference regarding Asian identity and the impact of such on living in America: Asian American Footsteps Conference: Embrace Your Passion and Others’ Stereotype. Although we were not able to explore the topics thoroughly and deeply enough within small group discussions due to the limited time, I have two main takeaways:

 

 

1. Don’t Let Go Your Passion

2. Stereotype Is Motivation

1. “My mother wanted me to be a nurse just like she and other relatives did, but I always had this passion to write. So I quit and became a poet…” This was Keynote Speaker Tina Chang talking about her experience as a Chinese immigrant and the obstacles on her way of pursuing dream. (more…)

Redesigning Learning Spaces & Flexible Seating

By John Camp, English Department Head

Redesigning Learning Spaces & Flexible Seating

from The Space: A Guide for Educators (Hare & Dillon, 2016)

As difficult as it may sometimes be to relinquish the manacles of some tradition(s) in education, I have focused on a main mantra when considering change: what is best for students and learning. Thus, driven by this guiding principle and my teaching methods, I decided to pursue a critical trend in 21st-century teaching and learning: the importance of space, flexible seating, and classroom design. The rub, however, was my particular classroom; since I arrived at St. Mark’s in 2008, I have been fortunate to teach in Room 8/Room 136, which historically had been the “Sixth Form Room” until 1995 (read the partner piece to this article on the history of this room here). Hence, making changes to the “seminar” classroom would be bold, as the beginning move would be removing the large, classic seminar classroom table that has been a fixture since 1995. When I teach, I do not often lecture (if at all), and while seminar-esque discussion is a crucial element of my classes, it certainly is not the only element. In all of my classes (VI Form electives “Getting LOST,” “Getting LOST II: The Writers’ Room,” “Rebels with a Cause,” and V Form English class “Books Without Borders”), students work in small and medium groups, write on their own, present to the class, do activities that include movement and interaction, utilize media, collaborate on writing and projects, watch videos/films, brainstorm and note take on the whiteboards, and conference one-on-one with me (see images below for most of these activities in action!). The large oval table was not conducive to quality student learning in these endeavors.  My first stop en route to change was John Warren. (more…)

Before it was LOST: The Sixth Form Room at St. Mark’s

By Nick Noble ’76, Communications Manager, Editor, and School Historian

Before it was LOST: The Sixth Form Room at St. Mark’s

In 1890, when the Main Building was first occupied, Headmaster William E. Peck set aside a small room along the Chapel corridor exclusively for the Sixth Form. A small narrow room, it had a fireplace, mailboxes for the Sixth Form (there were 27 Sixth Formers in 1893, the largest senior class up to that time), and Sixth Formers took to marking the window frame/sill area with Groton game results. That space is currently room 132, where Dr. Glomset teaches.  That original Sixth Form Room was under the direct supervision and authority of the Monitors. (more…)

Ceramics: “Patterns From Nature” Sculpture Garden {Pictures!}

By Ashley Lee, VI Form; Tony Banson and Darren Pike, V Form; Ashley Battiata, Charlotte Galusza, Lillie Harrison, Tucker Hartmann, Sam Leslie, Phoebe Macleod, Noah Robb, Cam Rubin, Bobby Sommers, and Tyler Young, III Form

Ceramics: “Patterns From Nature” Sculpture Garden {Pictures!}

Editor’s Note: The Patterns from Nature project began with exploring Biomimicry and EcoArt.  Students then researched nature on a microscopic scale. This involved studying the most finite details in structures to find intriguing patterns, forms, and textures.  Inspiration could be found in very obscure places: whether a human cell, rock crystal, or a plant stem. Gathering these designs from nature, students then sketched combinations of patterns and forms to arrive at unique clay module sculptures. This year’s Sculpture class decided to display their work outdoors in the Taft Sculpture garden.

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Trump’s Reform on Immigration Policies, Pros and Cons

By Jenny Shan, IV Form

Trump’s Reform on Immigration Policies, Pros and Cons

Editor’s Note: For this module in Social Justice class, students worked individually and/or collaboratively on a specific topic related to immigration policy or the refugee crisis. A Final Artifact of Learning (FAoL) should demonstrate understanding of the topic and “answer” the driving question in a comprehensive way.  It should synthesize learning by organizing and applying understanding on the topic/question.

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