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Painting the Underwater Protected “Ocean Park”

By Nicola Hartmann, U Jin Jo, Filip Kierzenka, Ivy Li, and Lucy Martinson, IV Form & Sean Farrell, Paula Hornbostel, Helen Huang, Paige LaMalva, Aidana Maitekova,  Isabelle O’Toole, Illia Rebechar, and Sophie Student, III Form

Painting the Underwater Protected “Ocean Park”

Map of National Monument

Map of National Monument. 150 miles SouthEast of Cape Cod:      4, 913 square miles.

On September 15, 2016, President Obama designated the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument (map right) to be the Atlantic Ocean’s first underwater protected area. Open to recreational fishing and phasing out commercial fishing will make this area, the size of Connecticut, a valuable research area and refuge for marine life. Dr. Scott Krauss, senior advisor and scientist at the New England Aquarium, was instrumental in securing this area of crucial habitats with 1,000-year-old deep sea corals, unique characteristics of three canyons — deeper than the Grand Canyon — and four deepwater seamounts — 13,000 feet from the ocean floor. Protected from oil, gas exploration, and overfishing, scientists will be able to observe and understand changes. The marked area will help preserve rare and endangered corals, fish, invertebrates, turtles, and three species of whale.

Students in Studio I made this new protected space their area of investigation. (more…)

My Exploration in Printmaking on a Scroll

By Grace Barron, V Form

My Exploration in Printmaking on a Scroll

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To turn a single, or in my case double, print into a lengthy scroll (h 82″ X w 40″), my first step was to print out large quantities of both blocks in different shades of purple. Before it came to all of that, I had to have an original print. For the original assignment, the Advanced Studio class went to the Wesley greenhouses, drew from life, and created a print based on our drawings. An experimental print assignment then followed. Looking at my single print, I noticed that the mirrored prints in a scroll would have an effect that would allow the viewer’s eyes to follow a path. While I first looked for a gradient effect with the top prints being the lightest and the bottom prints the darkest, I decided to scratch the idea and make the piece follow more of a random pattern.  I laid out the prints and arranged them in a way that I liked and then glued them to a large piece of paper. I wanted the viewer to see almost a scalloped effect. (Go to bottom of this page to see a larger rendering).  (more…)

Northern Pacific Seastar Asterias amurensis & My Zone as an Artist

By Mei-Mei Arms, III Form

Northern Pacific Seastar Asterias amurensis & My Zone as an Artist

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(See larger image below)

This seastar originated in Japan, Korea, China and Russia, about 20-40 metres deep off the coasts of these countries. It was introduced by the ballast waters of cargo ships as they returned from these countries and used ocean water to replace the weight of cargo. They can reproduce without the aid of another sea star and can multiply in the thousands. Due their rough exterior, the Northern Pacific Seastar does not have many natural enemies. Their larvae are so small that we cannot find a way to capture them and nothing appears to eat them at that stage in their life cycle. The Sea stars eat crustaceans and due to their numerous population, when they enter a new area, their numbers can wipe out the whole population of crustaceans. They can break off limbs and these limbs can grow in to new Sea Stars, but this process does take years. (more…)

My Voice In My Art

By Rory Colburn, VI Form

My Voice In My Art

I love to draw.  Drawing allows me to express my identity and opinions as an individual in a seemingly homogeneous world.  After three years and many long nights spent working on Studio Art homework, I have developed a creative process that not only produces technically proficient drawing, but also gives me a voice in my school.

When I begin a piece, I search for every detail in the composition, while my right hand makes seemingly crude marks with a light colored pencil on my paper. I slowly build these ghost lines, which layer to create a two-dimensional representation of the objects in front (more…)