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A War Hero Beyond the War

By Hans Zhou, VI Form

A War Hero Beyond the War

In the fall of 1931, a boy with dark hair from Manchester, Massachusetts, who was fairly short for his age, joined the St. Mark’s School Class of 1936 as a new second former.[1] His name was Henry Nichols Ervin, but many people used his nickname, Skip.[2] Born on October 21, 1918, in San Diego, California, Ervin and his family moved several times and attended schools in California, Nebraska, and Massachusetts prior to enrolling at St. Mark’s.[3] Ervin had a brother named Robert Gilpin Ervin, Jr., who was two years ahead of him at St. Mark’s, and a younger sister named Adele Ervin, who is still alive today.[4] Today’s St. Markers might know Henry Nichols Ervin as the abbreviated name “H. N. Ervin” on the board outside the dining hall marked with a star, indicating that he died in the war, among a long list of other people who also fought in this war. When waiting in line outside the servery, few people would look at the name on the wall and think of the life stories of these war heroes. However, Henry Nichols Ervin had a lasting impact on St. Mark’s School through his character. He was a student leader, he volunteered at Brantwood, and his family and friends funded various prizes to honor his character.

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Achieving the History of St. Mark’s—An Author’s Journey

By Nick Noble ’76, Communications Manager & Editor, School Historian

Achieving the History of St. Mark’s—An Author’s Journey

“Just how do you write a boSM books 018ok about history?” I have heard that question more times than I can count, along with its not so subtle companion: “Why?” Students past and present, who have struggled or who are struggling with research papers in school are usually the ones asking, finding it hard to believe that someone could see such a lengthy project through to the end. Then there are the casual online users who feel that google and Wikipedia are all they need, or those who feel that the past is behind us, over and done, and that studying yesterday is a waste of time when we should be looking forward to tomorrow. And sometimes folks are simply curious. In any event, the answers to these inquiries are both subtly complex and deceptively simple. (more…)