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The Journey: Structuring Travel Between Limol and Daru, An Advanced Studies in Global Citizenship Capstone

By Illia Rebechar, Kian Sahani, Naila Strong, VI Form; and Lina Zhang, V Form

The Journey: Structuring Travel Between Limol and Daru, An Advanced Studies in Global Citizenship Capstone

Note: This capstone was completed for Advanced Studies in Global Citizenship, a course required for completion of a Global Citizenship Diploma.

The capstone project assigned to the class was presented as an opportunity to develop an “empathetic response to a global challenge.” Our group, made up of Illia Rebechar, Kian Sahani, Naila Strong, and Lina Zhang, focused particularly on Papua New Guinea, and we looked into health and healthcare as our challenge. In order to build upon our culturally-relative mindsets, we had to move through the project using the design thinking process. This was comprised of five fluid steps: empathize, define, ideate, prototype, and test. Due to the limits of COVID-19, we were unable to “test” our prototype. We were able to learn more about Papua New Guinea and approach challenges we are not familiar with.

View the Group’s Capstone Project!
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Space is Physical. Place is Personal.

By Kian Sahani, VI Form

Space is Physical. Place is Personal.

As Thomas Bender says in Making Places Sacred, “the places we make act as mirrors to our lives. They reflect the good or ill, passion or indifference, with which we hold them back on to the people whose lives they touch. Places, as well as people, draw sustenance from how they are held in our hearts. How we feel towards them does strongly affect our lives” (Bender 1991: 321). For the Faith Family Missionary Baptist Church, it is the people and the connections made between them that makes it a place. Monique Azzara stresses this fact throughout her article, Grappling with the Impermanence of Place: A Black Baptist Congregation in South Los Angeles. To Faith Family, finding a sense of place does not require significance associated with a physical space, but rather with other people. 

In the article, Azzara describes how Faith Family has no permanent space of worship because of low funding. As a result, members must meet in a different place every time, removing the possibility of a lineal place. Yet, the members are still able to find a sense of place within the community. Azzara provides a strong example of a group of people finding a place within each other, without the need for a physical space, showing how one’s sense of place is relative to their view. The social and spiritual factors of Faith Family are made apparent by Azzara, who argues that “congregants build fellowship by pooling their resources in an attempt to follow the call of God to do good, and to recruit and save the disenfranchised” (Azzara 2019: 77). The members’ sense of place is shaped by these relationships of solidarity. At the same time, their place is challenged when it has no concrete features. 

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